T. G. Cook

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Information from a WGS boy

King Edward School Sheffield    http://homepage.ntlworld.com/pc1dmn/KES/staff/mastersList.html

MASTER

Qual

ARRIVAL

DEPARTURE

Cook, T. G.
History

 

Summer 1955 as senior History master, from Wellingborough Grammar School

Autumn 1965, to be lecturer in History at the Insitute of Education, Cambridge

As Senior History Master in succession to Mr. Wrigley, we welcome Mr. T. G. Cook, formerly Senior History Master at Wellingborough Grammar School, Northants.

Mr. T. G. Cook joined us at the beginning of the Summer term, 1955, as Senior History Master, having come from Wellingborough Grammar School, Northants, where he had also been in charge of his department.

He has taken an active part in all departments of School life. He was Housemaster of Wentworth and Group Scoutmaster of the K.E.S. Group (167th Sheffield); for many years he was the announcer at the Swimming Sports, where his powerful rolling Scots voice produced instant silence in the excited competitors and spectators. A keen and enthusiastic player of rugger, he was the coach and referee of the Under 13 Rugby XV (and was also a member of the Staff football team). As master in charge of the Junior History Society he was the original organiser of the famous "Cook's Tours" to places of historical interest. For many years he was a member of that awe-inspiring group of masters who were in charge of the `O' and `A' examinations, and in this capacity he was a tower of strength to us.

In all he did he was brisk, vigorous, quick-moving, energetic and efficient. He was cautious in the midst of educational controversies, and as befits a historian, moderate and thoughtful in expression. His unfailing enthusiasm, cheerfulness and courtesy were appreciated by all, not least by his colleagues, who held him in such high regard that for many years he was the Common Room Secretary.

He leaves us to become Lecturer in History at the Institute of Education, Cambridge, and we wish him every success in his new career.